Tag: fjällvandring

backpackingblogcampingGoing Lighter

A lighter kind of philosophy

As I came up over the ridge I couldn’t help but feel that maybe, just maybe, ultralight is not always the perfect solution for every backpacking trip. I stood there, wet, tired and miserable. I had just hiked 15 kilometers on a cold rainy afternoon along the Laugavegur trail in Southern Iceland. The trail stretches roughly 75 kilometers from the north in Landmannalaugar down to the south in Skogar. I made my journey in mid June a week after the trail had just been opened for the season. Snow was still prevalent along this part of the trail from Landmannalaugar to Hrafntinnusker. I flew in from Stockholm to Reykjavik and arrived around 9 in the morning. From there it was about a 4 hour bus drive along thin gravel roads, streams and an endless view of mountains and volcanic ash.

After 12 hours of traveling I just wanted to move, I needed to get out and walk and even though I arrived at Landmannalaugar at 4 in the evening, I made the decision to just walk. I couldn’t be bothered by the massive rainfall or the awesome hot springs. I pulled out my rain jacket, adjusted my backpack and made my way.

I arrived at that ridge after about 4 hours of hiking in wet, cold snow feeling like shit. Sure the first hour was a blast, but the rest, not so much. I just wanted to get somewhere warm and pitch my tarp for the night. When I reached that ridge overlooking the campsite the only thought that came to mind was “fuck”. My shitty day is turning out to be only worse, what I wouldn’t give for a 4 season, two layer tent, a thick winter sleeping mat and bag. Perhaps even a warm bed and shower. I looked over at the cabin walked in and requested a bed for the night. Of course I wasn’t alone here, all the beds were taken. I resigned and accepted the fact that tarp it would be.

When I stood there looking over the campsite, dread creeping in on the knowledge that I would now have to walk from the warm cabin down to the campsite about 100 meters away, cold and wet, walking in knee high snow in my mesh trail runners, knowing all too well that my night was about to be much worse than my day. I was unprepared for a winter hike, the thought that I would be hiking in knee high snow in the middle of June simply didn’t occur to me. While I tend to plan well, and pack warm. A tarp, trail runners and a torso pad with a summer quilt are not always the best choices for a winter hike. To make matters worse the campsite was placed at the bottom of a deep valley with no trees or wind shields in place. The wind was screaming down the snowy mountain side.

After a while I was finally able to set up my tarp in the volcanic ash, placed out my torso pad on my plastic trash bag ground floor and in the end, I was longing for that warm bed. The feeling of dread overtook me later on when I was really warm in my bag and had to get out, walk that 100 meters with frozen shoes on because I had to take a raging piss.

The moment of change

It was in that moment lying in my warm sleeping bag, knowing I would have to get up, get clothed and put those freezing cold shoes on and hike 100 meters in that snow in the middle of the night just to take a piss, that my love for ultralight backpacking and hiking altogether started to dwindle. This is how backpacking works, it tests us mentally and physically on all levels. This first days are always the worst. 

When I crawled back into my sleeping bag, wet and miserable I started to re-think how I would like to tackle these situations in the future. I started to wonder if the entire trail would be like this or if it’s just here, at the northern end of the trail. In any case I started to write down what changes I wanted to make to my gear. What worked what didn’t and so on. I wanted to find a good compromise of weight and comfort as well as usability in all situations. I found that while my general backpacking weight is very light, a base weight on this trip of about 2.5 kilos (5.5lbs), it was lacking in overall comfort and safety for surprise conditions. When I started to write everything down I found that I made certain compromises that were simply not necessary: I could easily hold the same weight with more comfort and safety without crossing the threshold to “stupid light”.

Some of the bigger changes I had to make was to my torso pad and sleeping mat (I carry both a blow up wide torso pad and an evazote sleeping mat) these together weighed about 500 grams. I also had to re-think my trailrunners. Not necessarily changing from trails runners to boots, more changing to a different form of trail runners.

Why not boots? Well, to be honest that first day I was longing for a pair of nice warm boots, longing for the comfort and warmth boots can obtain in cold, wet climates. Then I made my way into that first hut at Hrafntinnusker and saw that everybody’s shoes and feet were wet and cold. The only difference is that my shoes would be dry in the morning while everybody else will have to put hot warm feet into wet cold boots that would stay wet and cold the entire trip. On top of that I really like when my feet get hot in trail runners that I just plow through some cold water and voila! Cooled down and ready to go. What I wanted to change in my shoes was the sturdiness, I was sick and tired of stubbing my toe along the trail and it hurting like hell afterwards because my trail runners are the equivalent of walking barefoot as far as how much protection they give.

I was also looking at perhaps changing my tarp to a more traditional tent – heavier of course than what I have, but still keep me within my 3 for 3 goal, the 3 for 3 I talk about extensively in my book Ultralight and comfortable. It’s basically your biggest three items under 3 kilos. (Tent, sleep system and backpack)

I also started to re-think just what my goals where, the truth is, backpacking is not a black and white equation. I can’t give you all the answers and what will work for you specifically. I am constantly trying out new variations along new trails. I personally don’t like hikes longer than 14 days, you might like month long trails. More power to you. I also at this moment in my life have zero ambition to climb mount Everest or hike the entirety of the Appalachian trail.

In the end

My gear choices worked very well, but what had me thinking was that I had left very little margin for error. As I stated earlier, I am quite good at planning my trips, and forseable problems that might occur. I had even understood that there would be snow along the northern section of the trail. But for some reason it seemed to have slipped my planning. It turned out that the rest of the trail was more what I planned for, and I had a great time.

I did start to re-think my packing though, and it’s quite easy to go stupid light, and it’s something I still do from time to time and it’s usually in conjunction with arrogance. Sometimes I just take certain situations for granted because I am too comfortable with my own experience and skill. While it’s good to have knowledge and skill, it’s no crutch for making stupid decisions.

A thought

With that said, I want to propose a different approach to the ultralight movement, or at least my own movement of the Ultralight and comfortable variation. Just as the heavy miserable community or traditional backpacking community obsesses about “ruggedness, survivor, name brand” and so on. The ultralight community has a tendency to go overboard on the “ultralight, superlight, grams, ounces”. We spend so much time obsessing about weight, that somewhere along the lines we have to lift our eyes a bit and realize that different hikers have different goals. I would also like to suggest that lighter is not always more comfortable. Sometimes a backpack that weighs 1.3 kilo with a sturdy frame, hip belt and good carrying capacity is a much better choice than the 300 gram Ikea bag sewn into a backpack – for any purpose.

So we have to find a good medium, maybe we still have to obsess about the weight, but we have to take into consideration comfort, distance of hike and of course the goals of the hiker. When I made that trip in Iceland I couldn’t help but stare at everybody and think “those poor bastards, they simply have no clue”. I can only assume that everybody looked at me at thought “wow, that guy is simply amazing with his ultralight gear.. Looks like he is flying over the terrain”.

backpackingblogcamping

Tält för de Svenska fjällen

Okej.. A little different here, I will be writing this article in Swedish, sorry guys.. The only one I’ve ever written in Swedish, and probably will stay that way.. I will translate it later. To keep you occupied until that faithful day comes when the translation arrives I have a nice little video here from my hike in the Swedish and Norwegian mountains around Rogen.

Tält för den svenska fjällen

  • Okej, men klarar den av ”Svenska fjällen”

Den frågan är kanske den frågan jag får mest på Backpackinglight.se. Enligt mig är det en ganska relevant fråga med. Men jag vill påpeka att varje lokalbefolkning tror just att  deras fjäll är de mest hårda och opålitliga fjällen i världen. (Förutom Danskarna kanske..) Överallt i världen jag har vandrat är det helt klart att just ”vårt fjäll” som är den hårdaste fjället. Nu vet jag inte vilka av de länderna som faktiskt har de hårdaste och tuffaste fjällmiljöerna, men statistiken visar att det är just K2 i Himalayan som är det ”hårdaste” fjället med sina 30% av de som försöker bestiga berget som dör. (Everest har 5% odds)

Med det sagt, vad är det med fjällen som orsakar sådan oro och framförallt osäkerhet? Svensk fjällmiljö är i stort sätt relativt lugna fjäll. Visst kan vädret ändra sig  från en timme till nästa och det kan regna hårt och blåsa hårt i dagar. Ibland kan man tro att det till och med  är orkanvindar som rusar ner för  bergstopparna. (det kanske är så ibland). Det är inte ovanligt att jag ser folk skriver eller hör de säga ”det var minst 20 m/s vind”. Tveksamt att det verkligen är 20m/s, men  förståligt att man skulle tro det. Jag har själv varit i 18m/s (jag mätte med vindmätare) och kunde knappt stå. Alla tält har det svårt när vinden börja stiga upp mot ca 14m/s.

IMG_3731.jpg

Tittar man på de svenska fjällen skulle jag tro att ca 90% av de personer som vandrar där oftast håller sig till de väl etablerade lederna med stugor och toaletter längst vägen. Även delar av Sarek har stugor man kan besöka och nyttja. Även om man skulle hamna i skiten, är det inte troligt att man kommer att dö. Det är inte att underskatta de svenska fjällen, det är snarare att man har förståelse och förbereder sig på vilka omständigheter som råder. Ja, det kommer att regna, blåsa och stundvis vara ett rent helvete. Men det är långt ifrån alltid så. Och visst, det är bra att vara förberedd när man beger sig ut i fjällen, men man ska inte förväxla svenska fjäll under sommarhalvåret med att bestiga K2 eller Everest. De är helt olika äventyr som kräver helt olika sorters utrustning.

Så vad är ett bra tält för svensk fjällmiljö? Ett bra tält i fjällen är kort sagt: Det tält du känner dig trygg med och har erfarenhet med innan. Jag har själv vandrat genom stora delar av de svenska fjällen med en enkel tarp, ibland med och ibland utan innertält. I stora delar av fjällen skulle jag nog rekommendera innertält. Inte bara för mygg, men även pga de blöta underlag man ofta har. De flesta somrar jag har vandrat i fjällen, är det oftast blött på marken, överallt. Visst kan man använda en polycro eller tyvek ”groundsheet” för sin tarp, men de är inte helt optimal i längden. Till slut hamnar man med ytter, innertält och ”groundsheet”. Med andra ord, många olika delar att få ihop och ändå inte lika bekväm som ett helt, komplett tält.

DSCF5043Det är kul med tält utan golv.. förutom när det inte är det.. typ när marken är genom blött.. Innertält är att önska

Svenskfjäll tycker jag kan klassificeras så här:

  • Blött
  • Blåsigt
  • Mygg
  • Milt

Det är blött, ja det är blött både i marken från tynandet från snön på vintern och i luften då de hemska mörka molnen kan dra över och bara släpper oändlig mycket regn. Kan man ta ett tarp och polycro golv? Absolut, frågan är snarare vill man? Kan man ta med tält där man sätter upp inner och yttertält separat? Absolut, är det optimalt? Kanske inte. För mig funkar det att sätta upp innertält först och sedan yttertält. Med lite träning kan man få ihop ett sånt tält under en minut – det är inte mycket regn som kommer in då. Men personligen föredrar jag att kunna sätta upp yttertältet först och sedan innertält. De behöver dock inte sitta ihop som många tälttillverkare gör – då jag tycker om att kunna lägga yttertält om det är blött på utsidan av min ryggsäck och innertält på insidan. Med andra ord, det ska vara enkelt att dra isär inner och yttertält.

DSC06267Pyramid likande tält som denna är helt enastående på fjällen

Blåsigt Ibland, eller snarare oftast är det blåsigt i de svenska fjällen, och för den delen är alla fjäll blåsiga. Kanske inte orkanvind alla dagar, men inte helt ovanligt för vinden att blåsa uppemot 8-10 meter per sekund. Självklart är alla fjäll blåsiga! Det finns inga träd som fångar upp vinden! När vinden överstiger 12 meter per sekund duger inte ett vanligt tält längre, eller snarare, det är inte så många tält som duger i sådana vindar. Det är då tältbågar börjar ge vika, jag har sett och varit med om tältbågar som i princip exploderat i höga vindar. Och då inte endast billiga tält av dålig kvalitet.

IMG_2812.jpgHyperlite mountain gear Ultamid 2 väger 500gram är bland de mest stabila och lätta på marknaden

Här krävs mer kunskap än bombsäkra tält för att lyckas! Att bara köpa den dyraste tältet redo för en expedition på Everest  kan förstås funka, men det kommer fortfarande vara en skitkväll utan sömn. Har du försökt sova i tält under extrem höga vindar? Låtar som ett Formel 1 lopp som pågår utanför. Ska man sätta upp sitt tält på ett helt exponerat kalfjäll, då får man förvänta sig att något kommer att gå sönder. Det bästa tipset här är att titta på kartan innan du beger dig ut, markera områden som ser lite mindre exponerat ut. Tex nära skog, mellan stenar och så vidare och planera din resa utifrån att du vill kunna sova gott och tryggt på kvällarna.

IMG_3143.jpgTramplite shelter i Skottland

Sedan finns det klart bättre och sämre tält för fjäll. Enligt min mening är pyramidtält eller liknande formade tält de absolut bästa på kalfjäll, vinden har helt enkelt inte har något att ta tag i. Och genom att man använder stora tjocka vandringsstavar för att sätta upp tältet så finns det mycket liten chans för att något skall gå sönder. Viktigt är dock att det går att slå upp tältet relativt nära marken.

Nästa är de mer traditionella tunneltälten. De är lite tyngre men kan stå emot relativt höga vindar, så länge man sätta upp tälten rätt. Dock är det oftast de tälten som går sönder just för att man tror att man köpt ett tält rustat för Everest och sätter upp det på mycket exponerade platser.

Sist är tält med lätta bågar, fyrkantiga sidor och lätt tältduk. De kan börja vika sig och gå sönder redan i relativt milda vindar.

IMG_2831.jpg Tarptent Stratospire är ett superb tält för fjällvandring

Mygg – Om det är något som Sverige har mycket av är det mygg. Som tur är problemet som mest intensivt under endast några månader per år. Här, precis som tidigare, skulle jag rekommendera ett riktigt innertält. Inte bara ett myggnät över huvudet eller en liten bivack. Stundvis på fjällen kan det vara så tjockt med mygg att man inte får vara ifred en sekund. Föreställa dig då att den enda lugna stunden du får är när du kliver in i en liten bivack. Inte optimalt.

IMG_3268.jpgEnkel tunneltält är härliga i fjällen – liten, lätt, stabilt och golv

Mild – Det är alltid farligt för någon att underskatta fjällmiljön som det kanske verkar som jag gör. Så är det verkligen inte. Jag vill inte att ni ska tro att fjällen är som att vandra i skogarna runt Stockholm. Man ska ha mycket respekt för miljöerna man beger sig till, kolla ordentligt, läsa om området och förbereda sig smart utifrån vad man förväntar sig att möta. När jag skriver mild, handlar det mest om att det är väldigt sällan man kommer hamna i riktigt skit man inte förväntat sig. Svensk fjäll kan vara brutala stundvis, men som tur är, är det ytterst sällan under sommarmånaderna.

Andra saker att fundera på:

  • Använder du vandringsstavar, isåfall är det ganska poänglöst att använda tält som kräver tältbågar – Om man använder stavar är det lika bra att använda just dessa för att sätta upp sitt tält med. Då har med dubbelfunktion av sina prylar. Sparar både vikt och ökar stabiliteten.
  • Det är enkel att hamna i ”jag ska ha lättast möjlig tält” läge när man väl börjar bege sig in på lättviktstänkande. Oavsett vad jag skriver här kommer ni att köpa den absolut lättaste pryl och tar den upp till fjället för att esta. Det är en del av processen, men glöm inte att bekvämligheter är nog så viktigt som lätt vikt. Det är okej att bära med sig lite extra vikt för maximal komfort och trygghet. T ex tält med innertält – lite tyngre men mycket skönare och bekvämare.
  • Om man ska vandra 99% av sin tid på sommaren är det inte så förnuftigt att köpa ett tält gjort för vinteranvändning och som väger 5 kilo. Köp ett tält som du använder 99% av tiden, och hyr för resten.
  • Vad det gäller friluftsutrustning, får man oftast vad man betalar för. Betalar man 1000kr för ett tält från Kina, får man förvänta sig att den kanske är sämre kvalitet på material och sömnad och då är mer av en förbrukningsvara än något som förväntas hålla säsong efter säsong.

backpackingblogGearsarekVideo

Sarek national park in Video part 1

So I finally got around to editing some of my Sarek video from july, I’m not really sure the direction I want to take the films.. should they be long, with long melodic segments of nature and so on, or do I cut it down like I did here to show what I want to show then move on? It’s one of those issues I have with video really.. What is it I want to show? Do I talk, do I not talk? Let me know what you think and I will keep it in mind for the next videos.

Destinationstrip planningTrip report

Hike planning and mountain hikes near Stockholm Part. 1

Sharing is caring:

For this entry I am doing things a little differently. Normally I just do all my planning without anybody understanding how I go about things. Then on my site a few pictures show up and nobody gets any smarter. So I decided I want to share my entire planning phase inorder to hopefully help others in their trips. A window, as you will, into the large open landscape between my two ears… .  Read More